Mosque of Baba Adam Shahid

Mosque of Baba Adam Shahid

The mosque (pl. VIII&IX) is known after a locally famous saint Baba Adam, who lies buried in a simple grave nearby. Nothing historical is known about him. Dr. Wise, however, records the following tradition:
 
“Baba Adam was a very powerful Darwesh, who came to this part of the country with an army during the reign of Ballal Sen. Having encamped his army near Abdullapur, a village about 3 miles to the north-cast, he caused pieces of cow’s flesh to be thrown within the walls of the Hindu Prince’s fortress. Ballal Sen was very irate and sent messengers throughout the country to find out by whom the cow had been slaughtered. One of the messengers shortly returned and informed him that a foreign army was at hand, and that the leader was then praying within a few miles of the palace. Ballal Sen at once galloped to the spot, found Baba Adam still praying, and at one blow cut off his head.”
Mosque of Baba Adam Shahid

Mosque of Baba Adam Shahid

Mosque of Baba Adam Shahid

Mosque of Baba Adam Shahid

The story, though affording a charm of romantic tale, is little better than a pure fiction devoid of any historical sense. But the mosque has fortunately an inscription, which records:
 
“….This Jami Masjid was built by the great Malik, Malik Kafur, in the time of the king, the son of the king, Jalal ud-Duniya wal-Din Fateh Shah, the king, soil of Mahmud Shah, the king, in the middle of the month of Rajab 888 A. H. (August, A. D. 1483.)” Fateh Shah was the last Ilyas Shahi ruler of Bengal. The mosque has the usual oblong plan, measuring 43’ long by 36’ broad with octagonal towers at the four corners. The facade has been renovated, and the old decorations have disappeared, except for bands of moulding. In between the doorways can be seen an arched niche with a hanging chain. The battlements and cornice are curved, above which rise the domes, some of which have been rebuilt in recent time. The interior of the hail is divided into two aisles and three bays by stone pillars. The western side has three decorated mihrabs. The mosque fairly well represents pre-Mughal style of architecture.

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