Muazzampur

After crossing the Lakhya at Demra we follow Narsingdi road and about four miles from the main road on the right is the village of Muazzampur. It represents Muazzamabad of the mediaeval period, and was at one time the head-quarter of the district. It seems that Sikandar Shah established here a mint, and in the time of Alauddin Husain Shah (A.D.1493-1519), his governor, Khawas Khan, had here his headquarter, and ruled from this place the districts on either side of the river Meghna. The name Muazzamabad seems to have originated from Ghiyasuddin Azam Shah, son of Sikandar Shah.
In this village stands the tomb of Shah Langar, of whom nothing authentic is known. The tradition is that he was a prince of Baghdad, who having renounced the world, wandered through different countries and at last came to this place and died. To the north of the tomb stands a six-domed mosque, (now renovated) measuring 42’ by 30’, which formerly had an inscription, later broken to pieces. This fragmentary record, as read by Sayid Au lad Hasan, gives the name of the builder of the mosque as Firoz Khan, who constructed it probably in the time of’ Shamsuddin Ahmed Shah, son of Jalaluddin Muhammad.

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